Picture
Scientific research is driven by societal problems. When choosing a research problem, one
  must remember that finding the problem is only the beginning. After identifying the problem, one must articulate it in such a way that is carefully phrased and
  represents the single goal of the total research effort (Leedy & Ormrod, 2010, p. 48). The purpose of this analysis is to analyze what constitutes a
  researchable problem, the components of a well formed research problem, and what constitutes a reasonable theoretical framework for the need of a study. 
    When choosing a problem in society to research, “one must be sufficiently
knowledgeable about the topic of interest to know what projects might make
important contributions to the field” (Leedy& Ormrod, 2010, p. 46).  There are several strategies that may be useful for one to explore when deciding on a research problem:
1. Look at the world around oneself.
           
2. Read the literature.

 3. Attend professional conferences.
           
4. Seek the advice of experts.
  
5. Choose a topic that intriguing or
  motivating.
           
6. Choose a topic that other will find interesting and worthy of
attention  (Leedy& Ormrod,
2010). 
Looking around can be very helpful to the researcher because phenomena
that need explanation are everywhere. Reading the literature will help the
researcher“challenge research findings that seem contradictory to what one
already knows or believes to be true (Neuman, 1994). Attending professional
conferences will help the researcher to find out about hot topics within their
field of study, and also help them network with other professionals who share
the same research interests. Asking an expert about a topic of interest while
attending a conference can also be a great way of identifying a research
problem.  Finally, researchers must
also remember future employers may make judgments about them based on their topic of research. One’s resume or curriculum vitae will be more apt to attract employer’s attention if the research is pursuing an issue of broad scientific or social concern, or more generally, a hot topic in a particular field (Leedy & Ormrod, 2010, p. 48). 
    Once the researcher has used the six strategies listed above to find a
meaningful problem in society to research, the job of articulating it in such a
way that is carefully phrased and represents the single goal of the total
research effort then presents itself. There are five strategies that may be
useful for one to explore when articulating a research
problem:
1. State the problem clearly and
  completely.
           
2. Think through the feasibility of the project that the problem implies.

 3. Say precisely what one means

 4. State the problem in a way that reflects an open mind about its
solution. 

5. Edit one’s work (Leedy & Ormrod,
2010).
Stating the problem clearly should be top priority for the researcher.
One must avoid confusing or deceiving statements, or incomplete thoughts. Also, the researcher must remember to choose a problem that is practically
researchable. Having a sharp focus on a particular issue within a field of study
will help, but one must remember to account for how the research will be
conducted, who or what will be studied, how much money will it cost to fund the research, and how long will it take to conduct the research, among other things. Next, being precise is vital to the researcher when stating the problem. One’s failure to being precise with their words can “have grave results for one’s
status as a scholar and a researcher. In the academic community, a basic rule
prevails: absolute honesty and integrity are assumed in every statement a
scholar makes” (Leedy& Ormrod, 2010, p. 49). Also, stating the problem
should not involve one’s personal bias. It is important for researchers to
present the problem in a way not to sound as though they are intending to prove that “such-and-such a fact is true” (Leedy & Ormrod, 2010, p. 50). 
Editing helps to sharpen one’s thoughts by extracting any useless
verbiage. 
In conclusion, deciding on what constitutes a reasonable theoretical framework for the need of the study begins with identifying a good research question, most effectively, one that no one has ever thought to ask before. In our minds, researchers who contribute the most to our understanding of the physical, biological, psychological, and social worlds are those who pose questions that lead us into entirely new lines of inquiry. 

References

 Leedy, P. D., & Ormrod, J. E. (2010). Practical
  research: Planning and design
. Upper Sadle River, New Jersey: Merrill. 

Neuman, W.L. (1994). Social research methods: Quantitative and
qualitative approaches (6th
ed.). Boston, Massachusetts: Allyn & Bacon. 
 



 


Comments

03/10/2013 12:37am

i cnt understand pls help me

Reply
03/20/2014 7:39am

IMHO during the last couple of centuries many changes have been made in a scientific field of our life. Now the motivation of students that prepare sampe research papers for the first time or even on a daily basis can make them think in alternative way and meaning.

Reply
03/17/2013 1:14pm

Not wel explained

Reply
thomas klogo
06/07/2013 9:22am

what are the mail characteristics of a research problem?

Reply
thomas klogo
06/07/2013 9:24am

what are the main characteristics of a research problem?

Reply
06/20/2013 5:56am

what the heck i cant understand i thought "allstudentscanlearn"

Reply
07/12/2013 1:15am

I have been seeking information on this topic for the past few hours and found your post to be well written and has solid information.

Reply
01/18/2014 3:55pm

Thank you.lv enlarged my understanding on the concept

Reply
04/23/2014 6:19am

So what are the characteristics of a good research problem? Is not well explained.

Reply



Leave a Reply

    Author

    Michael L. Kendrick

    Archives

    October 2012
    September 2012
    August 2012
    July 2012